Home > Remote Workers Q&A > What are the biggest benefits to working remotely?

    What are the biggest benefits to working remotely?

  • Chris Schain

    For me, the biggest benefit is flexibility. I’m not spending 2-3 hours a day commuting to work in heavy traffic, which allows me to start my day early or end it late (or both). I’m also able to pick up my kids from school or get them to practice—whatever the day calls for. Because my company is built around remote employees, we’re entrusted and empowered to get our work done while also maintaining a positive work-life balance. And in turn, I’m even more productive and diligent about ensuring my work is getting done.

  • Colin Wright

    You can focus on your life outside of work while also working. It allows you to customize your space and how you use your time to get the most out of your day, and do your best work.

  • Nicole Fu

    Not having to set an alarm! I wake up naturally after I finish my last sleep cycle, which is typically after ~8 hours of sleep. You know how sometimes you wake up feeling very unrested? Your alarm probably rang when you were in deep sleep (stage 3). Not having to set an alarm lets your body cycle through the sleep stages, and wake up naturally.

    Setting my own schedule is pretty great too. I have the freedom to attend a yoga class or something in the middle of the day, and take a day off when I want to.

    Lastly, but of course, being able to combine work and travel. My overseas rent, and travel expenses amount to less than half of what I would spend at home (geoarbitrage). Not only that, when you’re working a “normal” job, your savings tend to go towards vacations anyway, so this lifestyle makes so much sense. Work from a new city/country, and get to explore it!

  • Jay Meistrich

    • There’s always someone awake to fix bugs or manage customer support.
    • We’re much less distracted during the day. We check in with each other when one of us wakes up and then we can do focused work the rest of the day, unless an important question comes up.
  • Theresa Cramer

    For me it’s about quality of life and the quality of my work. I try to work a normal 9-to-5 schedule, but if I’m feeling a bit foggy at 3 p.m. I can take a break and come back to my work later, and I think I do a better job because of that freedom. If I’m having a slow day, I can take an extra long walk with the dog or putter in the garden instead of staring out an office window (or distracting a coworker with idle chit-chat).

  • Andrea Bing

    Flexibility; save time from the commuting!

  • Taryn Barnes

    Autonomy is a huge bonus to working remotely. I can work whenever/wherever I like. In addition, I can spend time with loved ones without having to sacrifice on my work. For instance, I started filling out this questionnaire in Germany. I’m now at a coffee shop in West Hollywood. Having that freedom to be a nomad is definitely awesome! 🙂

  • Shannon O'Donnell

    Freedom and flexibility are the two aspects of remote work that I would find hardest to leave behind. As a freelancer, I also enjoy the benefit of setting my own schedule. It’s these traits that have allowed me to build a life that includes so much travel. There’s a near absolute freedom to create your own priorities alongside your work and then see them through.

  • Kelli Neely

    1. Flexibility to address personal appointments near home, or to respond to personal/home/family demands that always exist.
    2. Ability to work as needed to get the job done. Not all deadlines can be met between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., so working a hour or two here or there is a huge benefit.
  • Mike & Anne Howard

    Complete freedom, both in our schedule and our location. We can work during the bad weather, and get outdoors when the sun is shining. If we want to work from Europe, we hop on a flight and get inspired. Untethering from an office is one of the most rewarding experiences of our lives. We are growing so much as people, and in business as a result.

  • Jonathan Kalan

    The ability to work on my own time, and constantly gain new perspectives and meet new people by having the freedom to work from anywhere.

  • Kristen Marano

    The flexibility to design what I want each day to look like, and work from anywhere in the world as long as I have my laptop, phone, and an internet connection. I can choose to work from my home office, a coffee shop, or the other side of the world. I can visit family and work at the same time. In the past year I worked from a cafe in Mumbai, to a home in London, to a cafe in Toronto, where I’m sitting now.

    I can sleep in and then work late or vice versa; I can take a break during the day to ride my bike to the ocean, or meet a friend for lunch. I didn’t have that level of flexibility when I worked for a multinational agency.

    Working for myself is one of the most empowering career moves yet.

  • Conni Biesalski

    The unbelievable freedom that comes with it. Being able to make income from anywhere in the world is probably the most amazing feeling I ever welcomed into my life. You get to have special experiences in all these different places, meet an infinite amount of interesting people, and just really take advantage of this one life we have been given.

  • David Daniel

    From a work perspective, my productivity is GREATLY improved as a remote worker. I do not ‘commute’ in any sense of the word, nor do I have any daily preparations. I start working almost immediately upon my first cup of coffee, and generally take my laptop to bed with me.  

    Without distractions, I am clear to focus on what I need to accomplish.

  • Karen LaGraff

    The ability to better balance schedules by eliminating wasted time in traveling to and from the office every day.

  • Kat Christofer

    Freedom. Freedom from commute and negatively impacting the environment. Freedom to choose the hours that are most productive for me and for my company. Freedom to change locations and travel without having to take vacation days. Freedom to spend with people I think are the bomb-diggity or on pastimes I wish to develop.

  • Jodi Ettenberg

    The flexibility to both spend extra time in places I love, and to be able to spend time with people I love. This means going home to family if they need me, and being able to work from there. The thing about being flexible is it also allows you to stay still when you have to, something many jobs don’t build room to do. I’m grateful both for the extraordinary experiences I’ve had around the globe, and also for the time I could never have spent with family were I still a lawyer.

  • Dawn Pensack

    More time with kids, freedom over how you allocate your time (I prefer mornings/nights and taking off in the afternoon).

  • Liz McGrory

    I feel competent, which is a big value for me. I feel competent because I’m getting my job done the way I want to like my job as a business owner as well as a working mom. Another benefit is that I’m proud of the way I’m living my life! This has been such a big dream for a long time and I’m finally doing it. I feel like a high-functioning mom because I can be taking care of my family and working in a way that suits me.

  • Harald Johnsen

    I’m happy to say that I’m not even sure anymore. I used to go on about “the freedom to travel as much as you want” and so on, but now I think there may be even bigger benefits than that. There is a tremendous opportunity for true personal growth living and working this way—it’s something that is almost forced upon you, partly due to the various challenges (some of which come unexpected) that remote workers/digital nomads face. You’ll probably change more in five years of living and working this way than you would in a more traditional setting (although I do think it’s good to at least get a taste of that too).

  • Lauren Antonian

    Flexibility of time is the greatest benefit. For example, for parents it allows them the opportunity to pick up and drop off children from school or care without missing work; working from home also means being available to your family sooner. And, an often overlooked benefit of working from home means there are less distractions from colleagues.

  • James Clark

    Being able to live in different places around the world without needing a job in that physical location is the biggest benefit for me. I have spent time in places I never would have been able to if I was working a regular job.

  • Ben Dodson

    I find freedom to be the biggest benefit. You choose when you want to work, which means you can have a long lunch or take the morning off if you want. Of course this is also the biggest downside as it’s very easy to get into a cycle of doing very little work.

  • Lisette Sutherland

    People mainly go remote for the types of freedom it offers: freedom from the commute, freedom to make our own schedules, freedom to create our own workspaces, and freedom to choose what we work on.

    Companies go remote for different reasons. They are usually trying to maximize profits, grow the company, and as a benefit to keep the people they already have and entice new potential employees

  • Jen Hubley Luckwaldt

    Less wasted time. In an office, I was always getting dragged into meetings that weren’t really necessary, or fending off interruptions. When I’m working from home, I’m really working.

  • Jenn Leaver

    Working remotely has changed my life. I used to leave for my commute before my daughter was awake and get home in time to eat dinner and put her to bed. Those four extra hours a day give me back precious time that I was missing with my family. It’s the little things that matter so much: bringing my daughter new shoes when she (somehow!) breaks her sandal at school, picking my kids up at the end of the day and still having time to ride bikes outside before dinner, working on the couch next to my son when he’s home sick from daycare, telling my husband to have fun when he leaves on a work trip and not being worried about how I’ll manage to drop off and pick up the kids without him.

  • CarouLLou

    Freedom of living around the world… Waking up whenever I wake up (no alarm clock)… Being able to choose if I’m alone or in a social environment.

  • Scott Hanselman

    I drop off and pick up my kids at school every day.

  • Jan Lindborg

    For me there are many benefits. I don’t have to commute. I can dress how I like. I can work in peace and quiet without interruption. I can take care of things at home if they come up. I get to spend hours chatting to people who are now my friends. I get to see my wife and kids so much more than if I was in an office.

  • Roxanne M. Tamayo

    The biggest benefit about working remotely is freedom.

  • Hillary Heinz

    I adore my dog Emma and I couldn’t stand the idea of her spending the majority of her life waiting for me to get home from work. Or me spending way too much money on doggie daycare! She’d be so energetic at night when I just wanted to go to bed after a long day of work. Now I get to spend SO much time with her and go on lots of walks to clear my head. She’s a lucky pup!

  • Tom Paronis

    No commute and the ability to work at times that suit you best. For example, I got into the habit of working weekends when the weather was bad. I tried to avoid working late in the evening and usually succeeded.

  • Audrey Fairbrother

    Definitely the flexibility. Besides just moving every few years, I also enjoy being able to work from anywhere because it gives me the ability to visit family more often, and travel whenever I wish, which is my biggest passion.

  • Jennifer Bird

    I get more done and have less distractions. I’m able to use my commute time to get more done at work, at home, or volunteer in the school before work hours start.

  • Randle Browning

    Well, I’m currently sitting in an RV outside New York City, so I’d say the flexibility. 🙂

  • Christine Bielak

    More time to spend with family — able to deal with family issues without taking a whole day off — reduction in travel costs (HUGE!) — rarely use a sick day as you get to take breaks as needed — reduction in wardrobe costs (threw out my suits!)  — used to drive out of state (100+ miles a day), now my car rarely racks up 10 miles per week (so much for having to get a new car anytime soon)