Home > Remote Workers Q&A > Would you consider returning to a traditional office job, or are you remote for life?

    Would you consider returning to a traditional office job, or are you remote for life?

  • Theresa Cramer

    I’d return to the right office. I don’t think I’d ever want to be in a big office again, but a small office with a few coworkers and a flexible schedule would be fine.

  • Audrey Fairbrother

    Absolutely remote for life. Without the hassles of a commute and an inflexible schedule, my life has never felt more balanced. I have time for work, time for my family, and time for my hobbies. I’m a HUGE advocate for the remote work revolution. I feel everyone should have the privilege of experiencing this freedom.

  • Harald Johnsen

    It’s not something I think about at all anymore, to be honest. Never say never, but I much prefer working and living this way, and I’m very grateful that I get to do it.

  • Randle Browning

    I would do it in a job I really loved in a city I really loved, provided I never have to wear “business casual” again, or count up vacation days.

  • Jenn Leaver

    I don’t think I’ll ever work in a traditional office again. I’ve seen firsthand the positive difference that working remotely can make for your personal well-being and the well-being of your family and I don’t want to return to the life I had. I’ve been more engaged and effective in this remote job than I’ve ever been in a traditional office environment.

  • Mike & Anne Howard

    Remote for as far as I can see into my future. For us, running our own business is akin to stepping outside of the Matrix…it would be very hard to subject ourselves to that life after seeing what is really out here. I would recommend everyone try working remotely (for a company, or for themselves) for at least one year in their 20s or 30s, and if you don’t like it you can always go back…it’s just better to find out then have regrets later. Remember, nothing is a one-way street.

  • James Clark

    Never say never is what I usually tell people. Life is too long to make such concrete statements and you never know what opportunities life will throw your way.

  • Kelli Neely

    If I am able to continue control over that option, I would be remote for life!

  • Shannon O'Donnell

    Well, there’s nothing to return to for me. I started working remotely back in 2005, while I was still attending university. I waited tables as a student until I found remote-based work. From that point forward, I have never relied on any formal jobs for a living. I worked—briefly—in an office when I first moved to Los Angeles. I was new to the city and wanted to make new friends so I took a three-month part-time contract. I continued working remotely during this time, and that stint in an office was enough to show me how much I appreciate working for myself. I’ve been self-employed for more than a decade and I can’t imagine trading this lifestyle for office work.

  • Colin Wright

    It would have to be for a very good reason, and a really important project. And likely a whole lot of money on top of that. Working according to my own schedule, in my own space, is just too valuable to me.

  • Jodi Ettenberg

    I would consider it later in life but for the moment I’m enjoying the flexibility of what I’ve built.

  • Lauren Antonian

    I think I might be remote for life. However, given the right circumstances, I would not completely rule out the option.

  • Kat Christofer

    I’d love to say I’m remote for life. But I know better than to never say never.

  • Christine Bielak

    After a tough adjustment, I would only return to a traditional setting if I owned the business. Being remote has made me a better parent, caregiver to my elder parent, better spouse, and better employee. I work harder as I appreciate my job. I’m able to have so much more time for “me stuff” as I don’t have to spend time commuting. I have a better life as a remote.

  • Taryn Barnes

    At this stage in my career, I enjoy the flexibility of working both freelance and remotely. It gives me the autonomy to plan my workdays while having full control of my career growth. I can expand at my own pace. If I were to return to the traditional setting, I think it would have to be when I’m much older and settled down. Perhaps in a teaching setting.

  • Ben Dodson

    I don’t think I could go back to a traditional office now as I would find the time restraints too strict (and I’d hate the wasted time on commuting).

  • Dawn Pensack

    I’m remote for LIFE!

  • Chris Schain

    I’m remote for life. For me, the benefits so outweigh any potential negatives, that I prefer to work remotely for as long as I possibly can.

  • Nicole Fu

    I’ve been doing this for almost a year now and I already feel tired. Tired from constantly moving, juggling clients… I’m also getting desensitized to beauty from constantly seeing so much of it, which scares me. I love travel and never want to be disillusioned by it. I’m considering slowing it way down. I think my ideal scenario would be to spend 6 months of the year in Canada, and 6 months traveling. I’m trying to make that work, else I’m open to relocating to a tech/startup office somewhere new. Say, Berlin? San Francisco?

  • Roxanne M. Tamayo

    I am remote for life.

  • David Daniel

    I was offered a position making 4x what I was previously earning—but it was an office job. I worked it for 4 months and realized that the money was not worth my freedom and peace of mind.

    I would say never, but I always leave room for the outside possibility—however unlikely.

  • Liz McGrory

    Hands down, remote for life.

  • Karen LaGraff

    I really like having the best of both worlds with a split schedule of onsite and work-from-home days. I am a “people person,” so I like the human interaction, but need flexibility with my schedule for the other half of the week.

  • Hillary Heinz

    I was lucky to experience more progressive office environments with lots of great perks and it still doesn’t compare to the customization and flexibility of remote work. Let’s just say it would take a very special job to get me back into any kind of office setting.

  • Jan Lindborg

    I would, but it would need to compensate for the benefits I would lose.

  • CarouLLou

    Remote for life 😉  I really can’t imagine otherwise…

  • Conni Biesalski

    I cannot imagine ever going back to a 9-5 or traditional office environment. Once you have gotten a taste of this amazing freedom, there is no way back. I really enjoy working in different locations and environments and it really contributes to my creativity, productivity, and connections I make.

  • Jonathan Kalan

    The grass is always greener. Sometimes I’d love to be able to step into an office every day, see familiar faces, and have a standard routine. Other days I’d prefer to work from a coffee shop, or explore a new city and find a space there. It’s about balance—you don’t have to stick to one or the other, but you can work to balance it out by working from a few different places and rotating between them.

  • Jennifer Bird

    I’m remote for life! I don’t think I could get as much done or thrive in a traditional office environment. I’m more productive at home, have more hours in my day (no driving!), and I have great work-life integration.

  • Scott Hanselman

    I honestly don’t know. It would depend on the job. Likely I’d be remote a few days a week.

  • Jay Meistrich

    I would return to an office if a job required it, but I would likely not follow the typical 9-5 schedule. I’ve experimented with my productivity a great deal with the freedom of working remotely, and a solid block of work in the sunniest part of the day does not work for me. To maximize my productivity I would probably bounce in and out of the office throughout the day, take a lot of walks, and spend a couple hours doing focused work at a coffee shop in the middle of the day.

  • Tom Paronis

    I’m in the 4th quarter of my career and greatly prefer remote, but if the right situation came up, wouldn’t mind going to an office. Again, the ideal would be 1-2 days on site and 2-3 days at home.